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Showing posts from 2016

Rancho Azul y Oro receives EVOO certification for 2016 olive oil!

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We are very pleased to announce that our 2016 olive oil was awarded its extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) certification from the California Olive Oil Council on December 1, 2016.  This year's oil has been identified with strong robust flavors and high astringency, with positive flavor descriptors being identified as artichoke, cinnamon, and green almond.  I know, don't even say it.

Receiving our certification is one of the best Christmas presents we could receive and we are off and running, now, for 2017.

Happy Holidays to you all!

Introducing the 2016 Rancho Azul y Oro Olive Oil . . .

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Olive harvest began at sunrise on November 5th, 2016 and was our largest harvest.  In order to be certified EVOO, the olives must be picked, sorted, and milled within 24 hours, and then pass a chemical test and then a sensory evaluation in a blind tasting by an expert panel.  Our goal is to get them in and milled within 12 hours.
Our olive oil passed its chemical test on November 7th, 2016 and is being prepared to be submitted to the tasting panel for evaluation.  In the meantime, our olio nuovo will be released in the next two weeks, and then the balance of the oil will be allowed to rest and the oil will then be filtered and bottled in January.  
This was our largest harvest, and unfortunately, circumstances precluded many family members from participating this year.  Had it not been for the very generous donation of time and effort on the part of our friends, Bing and Karla Seid, we may not have been able to complete this very daunting timeline.  We cannot thank them enough.  We also…

What is Olio Nuovo and why is it special?

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As we near our 2016 olive harvest, we are often asked, what is olio nuovo and why is there the rush to get that oil?

Olio nuovo, simply put, means new oil.  It is literally the oil which was just an olive a week or two before, pressed and bottled.  It is nearly a neon green/gold color and it will be much more grassy, zesty, pungent, and spicy.

Customarily, the olives are picked, milled, and returned to the grower in large stainless steel tanks called fustis.  The olive oil will then rest for approximately a month (as will the grower and bottler), and then, the sediment, is filtered out, leaving a brilliantly clear, beautifully finished oil.  

The olio nuovo should be enjoyed more quickly than the finished olive oils because it is unfiltered.  The up side of the unfiltered oil is that it is the most fresh and pungent, the down side is that the sediment that is still in the olio nuovo can reduce its shelf life, unlike the more polished, final version of the oil

It is one of the very special…

What is Olio Nuovo and why is it special?

Image
As we near our 2016 olive harvest, we are often asked, what is olio nuovo and why is there the rush to get that oil?

Olio nuovo, simply put, means new oil.  It is literally the oil which was just an olive a week or two before, pressed and bottled.  It is nearly a neon green/gold color and it will be much more grassy, zesty, pungent, and spicy.

Customarily, the olives are picked, milled, and returned to the grower in large stainless steel tanks called fustis.  The olive oil will then rest for approximately a month (as will the grower and bottler), and then, the sediment, is filtered out, leaving a brilliantly clear, beautifully finished oil.  

The olio nuovo should be enjoyed more quickly than the finished olive oils because it is unfiltered.  The up side of the unfiltered oil is that it is the most fresh and pungent, the down side is that the sediment that is still in the olio nuovo can reduce its shelf life, unlike the more polished, final version of the oil

It is one of the very special…

"In seed time learn, in harvest teach, in winter enjoy." ~ William Blake

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Harvest is in full swing at the rancho.  It seems as if the heat has broken -- except on the days that the rancho worker bees decide to pick.  So, let's recap where we're at currently.  In our last episode, the Petite Sirah was picked, and since then, we made it and it's in the barrel.  The Cab was picked, and it was our largest Cab harvest ever -- and we still lost all of what we call Block 2, which is hilarious, if you actually saw the size of it.  Here are some photos from our 2016 Cabernet Harvest:







I know, they're all starting to look the same.  They were so beautiful, the photographer could not resist the urge to photograph nearly every cluster.  As with the 2013 Petite Sirah, the feeling about these particular grapes is that the wine promises amazing things.  
So, even though the harvesters have olive harvest barking at their back door, they agreed to push their space limitations and test their skill set and accepted over a half ton of Grenache -- I know -- and a q…

"In seed time learn, in harvest teach, in winter enjoy." ~ William Blake

Image
Harvest is in full swing at the rancho.  It seems as if the heat has broken -- except on the days that the rancho worker bees decide to pick.  So, let's recap where we're at currently.  In our last episode, the Petite Sirah was picked, and since then, we made it and it's in the barrel.  The Cab was picked, and it was our largest Cab harvest ever -- and we still lost all of what we call Block 2, which is hilarious, if you actually saw the size of it.  Here are some photos from our 2016 Cabernet Harvest:







I know, they're all starting to look the same.  They were so beautiful, the photographer could not resist the urge to photograph nearly every cluster.  As with the 2013 Petite Sirah, the feeling about these particular grapes is that the wine promises amazing things.  

So, even though the harvesters have olive harvest barking at their back door, they agreed to push their space limitations and test their skill set and accepted over a half ton of Grenache -- I know -- and a q…

Harvest Season has begun at Rancho Azul y Oro!

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After a very hot, smokey month of August, our Petite Sirah decided it had it with this growing year and wanted to be wine more, so wine grape harvest began here on Wednesday, August 31st.  This harvest went much like August did, it was hot, it was long, and the two member crew both got stung by bees (at least it wasn't rattlesnakes), but we hope that one day, when we are sitting with a glass of the 2016 Petite Sirah, all we remember are these beautiful images:







Smoke gets in your eyes . . .

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What a month.  That's all one can say about the month from July 23rd to August 23rd.  Monterey County's problems started with the Soberanes Fire, which started back on July 23rd.  Due to prevailing winds, the smoke from Soberanes infiltrated our canyon and permeated every aspect of what we do.  While it is unlikely this fire would ever reach the rancho, its smoke certainly has.  It is now 83,000 acres, there are 2,421 fire personnel battling this fire, and it is 60% contained.  The expected containment date is September 30.

Some time during the first week of August, with temperatures nearing 115 in our area, the Mineral Fire started, which was approximately 20 miles due north of us.  This fire did have the potential to reach us.  There was no big fire break between the rancho and the Mineral Fire, such as the 101, and our winds generally blow from north to south, so we were definitely on edge.  Thanks to the work of the amazing firefighters, this fire was held to 7,050 acres an…